Thursday, December 21, 1769
Near Arroyo del Oso.



Gaspar de Portol√°
The 21st, we made the same distance as on two of the marches that w^e had made on the previous journey and got out of these mountains. Here one of the two muleteers, that had deserted at the Punta de Finos, presented himself and informed us that the other was still in the mountains with three of our Indians who were with him. He declared that this range was the most rugged that he had seen in his life, and that, only with the greatest labor, he had been able to make his way along the coast . . .on the whole coast, not only were there no indications of a port, but there were not even inlets ; this information entirely removed the doubt, which probably no one now entertained, that the port
might be there. This day we proceeded for five hours and rested on the 22nd.

Miguel Costansó
In the morning we broke camp, and, following the road we had opened, we finally emerged from the mountain range. We descended to the beach which we followed for a distance of a league and a half. We halted near an Indian village, of which the inhabitants, advised of our arrival by the mountaineers, came out to welcome us. These Indians gave us to understand, by means of signs, that they had kept one of the deserters in their village where he had been resting for three days. We went there immediately and he did what he could to save us a part of the distance, for, as soon as he caught sight of us he came out to meet us; his feet were swollen, and he walked with difficulty.
Asked what his motive was for deserting, he replied that his intention had never been to desert, but that he had gone out shooting geese along the coast, and his companion had proposed to him that they should follow the mountain range along the coast in order to be the first to discover the port of Monterey, and so gain the reward upon returning to the camp with the news; that they had walked all that day and the following one, as it appeared to them that upon discovering a point they would find the port behind it; that, having absented themselves for two days from the camp without permission, they felt sure that they would not be given any more severe punishment because of their being absent four or five days more without returning; and that if they should have the good fortune to discover the port, the offense would be excused, and, furthermore, they would receive the reward. And so they determined to continue their journey until they saw the end of the mountain range, which, with inexpressible toil and labor they succeeded in passing, at times even rolling down a hillside. Asked concerning his companion and the two Californian Indians who had also deserted, he replied that his companion on the trip was in a worse condition than himself, and that he had persuaded the Californian Indians to remain with him among some fishermen from the mountains, who lived together in a village at the beginning of the mountain range, until such time as he might be able to use his feet to continue the return to San Diego, where the speaker was also bound, not having the courage to cross the mountains again in search of us, both from fear of the punishment and from having a yet greater fear of the ruggedness of the mountain range.
We travelled for three leagues on this day's march.

Fray Juan Crespi
On this day of Santo Tomas we two said Mass and all the people heard it. We started out in the morning by the same road which had been opened on the way up. We finally came out of Sierra de Santa Lucia, descended to the beach, which we followed for the space of a league and a half, and after three leagues' travel halted near a village of heathen, who came out to receive us, having been informed by the mountain Indians of our arrival. They told us by signs that they had had as a guest one of the men who had deserted at the bay of Point of Pines in the first part of this month, and that he had been in the village for three days. They immediately went after him, and he did what he could to save them trouble, for as soon as he saw that they were going to the village he came to the camp, walking painfully on account of swollen feet. The commander asked him why he had deserted. He replied that it had not been his intention to desert, but, having gone to the shore to shoot geese, his companion proposed to him that they should
go on and follow the mountains along the coast, in order to be the first to discover the harbor of Monterey and win the reward by returning to the camp with the news. They traveled all that day and the next, believing that if they should discover a point they would find the harbor behind it. Having gone so far as to absent themselves from camp for two days without leave, they were sure that they would not receive any greater punishment if they should remain four or five more without returning, and that if they should have the good fortune to discover the harbor they would be forgiven for the fault, and, besides, would receive the reward. For this reason they decided to continue their journey until in sight of the end of the mountain range, which they succeeded in crossing with indescribable labor and fatigue, sometimes rolling down the declivities. Being asked about his companion and the two California Indians who had also deserted, he replied that his companion had suffered even more than he from the effects of the journey, and had begged the Indians to allow him to remain in their company with some fishermen who were camped at the entrance to the mountains, until such time as he could again set foot to the ground for the purpose of resuming the return journey to the harbor of San Diego, where he was going, for he had not the courage to again cross the mountains to join the expedition, partly because he feared being punished, and partly because he had suffered even more from the roughness of the mountains.


December 20 Day two at Wagner Creek.
December 22 Day two near Arroyo del Oso.